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in answering it. >> what do you say to the secularist? >> i say let's engage on the science. let me hear what your arguments are and then let's respond to them. and i would ask in turn that you listen to what the scientific community has to say. it's perfectly fine to have a great conversation with many people about the science itself because the science is so robust at this point. i mean, we have basically known for over 20 years now that, and it actually boils down, for all the complexity of the science it's really quite simple. it's real, okay, climate change is real. it is mostly human caused this time. there have been climate changes over many millions of years in the past that had nothing to do with human beings. this time it's mostly being caused by our activities. third, it's going to be bad. in fact, it's bad now and it's going to get worse. fourth, there's hope, that there are lots of solutions already on the table that are in fact already being implemented in this country, communities all across this country as well as around the world. there's an enormous amount of work that we ca
of a classroom or a building? >> it was inside of the science building, but i don't know if it was in a classroom or a hall way. i don't have that information. >> was it mid-class? >> i don't know. it was sometime this morning. i'm not sure what time it was this morning or if they were in a classroom or a hall way between classes. i don't know. >> just to confirm, one victim, the one student injured, airlifted to a hospital. one single injury? >> that's the information that we have at this point, yes. >> i know this is very, very early, but any connection between the student who was shot and the student shooter? >> we don't have information on that at this point. >> final question of other schools in the area on lockdown? what's the status? >> that i don't know. i don't know if we lockdown the other schools in the taft area or not. >> ray pruitt from the kern county sheriff's department. we thank you so much for calling in. give us a call back if you hear anything else. that is new information we got from this school shooting. the fact that the shooter was a student and used a shotgun. this happe
, judy. > thank y. >> brown: next, a science and medical story involving research from the frontiers of robotics. ray suarez looks at how doctors are using high tech toys to help people with special needs. >> what's your favorite game? >> "mario cart," the original. >> reporter: in a carefully monitored session that seems more like playtime than therapy, researchers at the university of notre dame have enlisted an unusual therapist to assist their studies of children with autism, a two footobotamed kelly. >> i got to skip school today, because of you guys. >> that is so cool. i am so glad. >> reporter: kelly is working with 11 year old liam mcguire and a co-therapist of the human kind, kristen wier. >> for liam, kelly has become a friend. i mean, he's very excited to see her. you can tell, he lights up when he sees kelly, he leans forward, his posture changes, his eye contact is much stronger. i think it's something he can relate to, and feel successful with. >> i like to play soccer. >> reporter: robots, like th one are ing introded in research settings where specialists are compili
, celeste ward gventer thank you. >> thank you so much, judy. >> thank you. >> brown: next, a science and medical story involving research from the frontiers of robotics. ray suarez looks at how doctors are using high tech toys to help people with special needs. >> what's your favorite game? >> "mario cart," the original. >> reporter: in a carefully monitored session that seems more like playtime than therapy, researchers at the university of notre dame have enlisted an unusual therapist to assist their studies of children with autism, a two foot robot named kelly. >> i got to skip school today, because of you guys. >> that is so cool. i am so glad. >> reporter: kelly is working with 11 year old liam mcguire and a co-therapist of the human kind, kristen wier. >> for liam, kelly has become a friend. i mean, he's very excited to see her. you can tell, he lights up when he sees kelly, he leans forward, his posture changes, his eye contact is much stronger. i think it's something he can relate to, and feel successful with. >> i like to play soccer. >> reporter: robots, like this one are b
. [applause] >> thank you very much, everyone, for coming. thank you to the department of political science. today, we have for pronounced -- we have for pamela spirit we will have a bit of discussion between them and then moved to audience discussion. first, deborah is the this -- is a professor of ethics and society. she is also the senior associate dean for the humanities. she is a member of the philosophy department and director for ethics and a society. her research focuses on the ethical limits of the markets. a place of equality in a just society and a rational choice. she also works on ethics and at the -- in education. she is co-editor of the forthcoming collection, occupy the future. he is a graduate of mit and an early participant in occupy washington -- occupy boston. he specializes in web applications and design. a co-founder in danger of some in cambridge. -- actually, just in central square. if he continues to be engaged in outspoken protests, malfeasance, and a finance industry mismanagement. and next is phil thompson. actually, he is on the end. an associate professor. i'm
rounds and then walked into the science building midway through first period. >> we have video of him entering the school, trying conceal the shot gun. we have the video showing that he is nervous. >> officers say the boy walked to the front of the classroom and opened fire, striking a jean-year-old classmate at near point blank range. the students began to flee. trying to hide in closets and run out of the room, another shot, this one missed a target, another 16-year-old boy. morgan was in the classroom and said that the gunman began calling out a name. after he asked for a student three times. the student popped his head up from behind where he was hiding and apologized. >> for what? >> for bullying him, freshman year. >> then the classroom's teacher stepped in between the 12 gauge shot gun and the fleeing students. the well liked teacher spoke to the boy like his friend and investigators say the boy told him, i don't want to shoot you. meanwhile the school's counselor helped to distract the gunman while the rest of the 28 students escaped. >> this teacher and this counselor stood t
austrian finance minister of climate change science. financeok our former scienc minister around the world read only for started, he said humans were not responsible and was w opposed to any action on climate change. we traveled for four weeks. i took into the u.s., the u.k. by the end, i got him to a point where he said, "climate change is happening and humans have probably cost part of it." i was able to convince him somewhat of the need to switch to renewable energy. we need to make these transitions right away toward wind and solar, clean energy, because if we don't, we are going to see more and more of these devastating extreme weather events that occurred not just australia, the people all around the world. >> anna rose, how sycophant is the position of the u.s. on climate change >> -- how significant is the position of u.s. on climate change? >> it is extremely significant countries like the street and around the world. the rest of the world has started to act around the world. the europe has been doing it for those big stepsad will not happen until we get the united states to put a
you to the department of political science. today, we have for pronounced -- we have for pamela spirit we will have a bit of discussion between them and then moved to audience discussion. first, deborah is the this -- is a professor of ethics and society. she is also the senior associate dean for the humanities. she is a member of the philosophy department and director for ethics and a society. her research focuses on the ethical limits of the markets. a place of equality in a just society and a rational choice. she also works on ethics and at the -- in education. she is co-editor of the forthcoming collection, occupy the future. he is a graduate of mit and an early participant in occupy washington -- occupy boston. he specializes in web applications and design. a co-founder in danger of some -- danger awesome in cambridge. -- actually, just in central square. if he continues to be engaged in outspoken protests, malfeasance, and a finance industry mismanagement. and next is phil thompson. actually, he is on the end. an associate professor. i'm giving their introductions in the order t
've got good lath is going to be taking over, and smith is going to be moving to the science, space and technology committee -- >> host: so bob goodlatte of virginia's going to be the new chair of the judiciary committee? >> guest: right. so, and he was involved in the writing of sopa. whether they're going to try to take up some sort of new copyright enforcement is yet to be seen. >> host: do you see sopa, pipa policy proposal coming forward begun? >> guest: i don't think there's an ap tide for the -- appetite for the same fight again. whether there'll be some sort of effort to have enforcement of copyright rules online i think is a possibility, but, i mean, i think a lot of lawmakers you wea little frightened by how the sopa fight went and the backlash to that. i think the movie industry and the recording industry is kind of looking for maybe some smaller issues that they can push. >> host: now, lee terry is taking over for cliff sterns, correct? on the energy and commerce committee, is that right? >> guest: no. he is taking over the position that mary bono mack had on the commerc
't supposed to happen. american political science is basically pluralist in nature that says that they are contending forces in society to counter big corporations whether it is the labor union or other kinds of institutions that counter that the power of the corporation. but corporations will always imagined to be governed by antitrust law. they were not supposed to control a handful, 64% of all of the wealth and the country. that kind of power just isn't imagined in spending billions of dollars a year lobbying congress. that wasn't imagined in american political science so i don't really think american political science has grappled with what we have now. and also our economic theory always presumes basically a market economy. he may have wanted to overthrow the competitive capitalism, but citigroup did. when and if you are too big to fail that basically means you are not a market anymore. you know, you are into something else. and i don't think an economic theory either there were any real answers or ideas for how you deal with the situation like this. so i think that we a
is a great company, we've been this business for 32 years. we have tremendous science based products that are high in health and safety and a tremendous business opportunity. we're proud of where we are today and confident about our future. >> after the herbalife meeting ends, michael john so thson wil appear on skauk squawk on the treat. must see tv. this story has legs. >> as an investment story, i can make an argument that perhaps we're overdoing it a bit. but as a story, come on. the fact as of yesterday this new plot twist with dan taking on where he thought his friend, referring to him only, though, as the short seller. i thought that was a little hostile in his letter. just adds another layer of intrigue. and significant money at stake for both hedge funds. >> and herb greenberg has been on this for a very long time. michael johnson has come on my show at mod money. but he has a documentary that's fascinating. in terms of timely, i've never seen anything like it. >> it has been in the works for months. so check it out if you haven't already. called selling the dream. but in te
to go to that is on the far side of the moon that can be the robotic science can do the mining for the ice crystals and convert that into hydrogen and oxygen which is fuel the conference recently as following a workshop that has been sent out in the international learning basis by practicing on the island of hawaii to assemble a large number of large objects. you put the first one down and where are they expected? another one down at some distance away how do you put them together? if it's on hawaii, you do that through a satellite back to the mission control. so you prove that you can do something like that here in the united states. then we do it at the moon. why am i so enthusiastic about that? because that's exactly what we want to do at mars. we want to put people on the moon of mars who can then assemble the base we will then send people and we should assure ourselves we should protect crew members from radiation as much as possible before they ever go somewhere and that's the moon, too. >> kevin has a two-part question and i should ask the second part first. do you belie
. but the key thing is he says science and technology could be a way to improve the economy. from what we've seen on our visits though,, both he and perhaps google's schmidt might have their work cut out for them. one of our earlier visits we were shown what appeared to be an internet center at a library. in fact it was a intranet center. the folks in north korea have almost no access to the real worldwide web and in our last visit, jon, we saw more mobile phones out in the streets but there is a hitch there too. these mobile phones can not connect outside of north korea. in fact they're more dumb than smartphones. however who knows. schmidt might have the idea to get a few more phones, google phones, google tablets google searches in north korea. jon: information wants to be free. greg palkot in london. thank you. jenna: it is a known fact that obesity is not good for your health but seems some risks get more attention than others. a new survey finding while most americans realize carrying too much pounds can contribute to heart disease and diabetes there are other series -- serious cons
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> bill: thanks for staying with us, i'm bill o'reilly in the miller time segment tonight. let's get to the sage of southern california, joining us now from santa barbara. all right, miller, you heard herald talking about al gore and al jazeera and you say? >> well, you shouldn't get too deep with al gore. he is a bad guy. ethically speaking he makes john edwards look like sur thomas moore. horn dog. this guy is genius at rationalization. imagine the the contraption he has put up inside that thin little pea pod he calls his brain case to be allowed to think that he at the vanguard of the green movement can do business with big oil like this. how does gore sleep at night other than, you know, eating a bag of donuts and hooking himself up to an iv of yahoo and nodding off in sugar coma. he is an empty hack. is he such an empty hack i'm surprised he didn't become our president. at this point i would say al, go seek be a solution from oprah. that's
's not worth it. >> cenk: that's tough to hear every single time. e.s.p.n. explains the science of concussion a little more. >> big blows like this one can be the equivalent of taking a sledgehammer to the head. it's not just pro football. studies show high school football and even pee wee league football players are exposing themselves to the dangers of head trauma. >> he is not alone in committing suicide. recently andre waters, known as dan day dirty waters killed himself, duerson with the bears and ray easter ling. >> game over, politics are turning the sports world upside down. great to talk to you. talk to me about these concussions. that what can it is nfl do about it? >> very little. they find them receivers in a similar position as the tobacco industry, you're never going to make a cigarette safe. similarly, you'll never make the sport of playing football safe, whether you're talking about the pee wee league, high school, pop warner or the nfl. the case of junior, it puts an exclamation point on now what are several years of new medical data we now know about the cost of playing foot
, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> cenk: so we've been telling you about this stop and frisk program in new york city. it's outrageous because they go into private buildings--the police get permission from the landlords, whether the landlords want to give permission, that's a different question. but they go in and without reasonable suspicion they stop people all the time and frisk them to see if they can find something on them. but finally a judge in manhattan federal court said this is kind of unconstitutional, quote while it may be difficult to say when precisely to draw the line between constitutional and unconstitutional police encounterers such a line exists. and nypd has systematically crossed it when making trespass stops outside buildings. now to give a sense of why she ruled that way well, there was an enormous number of stop and frisks in 2011, 685,000 of them. my favorite number is that 88% of the people who were stopped and frisked were totally innocent. it doesn't appear that they're hitting the right target quite often. i wonder if
day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade.
: lawrence is a professor of forensic science. cyanide is not easily detected on drug skreengs and a small amount can kill someone. >> it's usually kept under lock and key. again, if you work in the photographic industry, if you worked in a metal processing plant, or you worked in a plant with -- where they work with insecticides, those are places you would find cyanide. >> reporter: soits not all that difficult to obtain? >> it's not that difficult. if somebody wants to get it, they can get it. >> the only thing the chicago police would say on record is they are investigating khan's death as a murder and working closely with the medical examiner. as for the lottery check that had been mailed out, an official with the illinois lottery says records show that the check was cashed several weeks after khan's death. wolf? >> mary snow, thanks very much. >>> and you're in "the situation room." happening right now, tens and thousands of lives potentially at risk in what could be the worst flu season here in the united states in years. a leading doctor tells me, though, it's not too late to protec
science. third, you are going to see us significantly expand the expertise in our law firm, the national chamber litigation center and in other areas of our institution, in order to deal with regulations. our preference is always to work within the legislative and regulatory processes and we do that on a daily basis. but when rights have been trampled on, or regulators have overstepped their bounds, we'll take the necessary legal action. let me turn to immigration reform. america has grown and thrived because we have attracted and welcomed the most talented and the hardest working citizens of the world to our shores. immigrants teach in our universities, invest and invent in our technology companies, staff our hospitals, care for our elderly and young, harvest our food, and serve in our armed forces. given our changing demographics, we need more workers to sustain our economy, support our retired population, and to stay competitive. even with high unemployment, we have millions of job openings that go unfilled. either the workers come here to fill those jobs or the companies take all of
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. woman: we're helping joplin, missouri, come back from a devastating tornado. man: and now we're helping the east coast recover from hurricane sandy. we're a leading global insurance company, based right here in america. we've repaid every dollar america lent us. everything, plus a profit of more than $22 billion. for the american people. thank you, america. helping people recover and rebuild -- that's what we do. now let's bring on tomorrow. shh! [ coughs ] shh! [ breathes deeply, wind blows ] this feels cool. [ male announcer ] halls. let the cool in. >>> only two weeks to go now until the obama administration begins, the second obama administration. two weeks to go until the ceremonial swearing in of president obama and vice president biden at the u.s. capitol. it will happen on monday, january 21st. now, that is also martin luther king day. interesting, though. the constitution says the president has to be sworn in specifically on the 20th day of january, not the 21st. but the 20th of ja
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ male announcer ] how do you make 70,000 trades a second... ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. >>> and we are back. attitudes may be changing, but the white house has a heavy lift on its hand when it comes to gun control. a task force led by vice president joe biden is looking to reinstate the assault weapons ban. and as the "washington post" reports, broader gun control measures are also on the table. regulations that would require universal background checks for firearm buyers, track the movement and sale of weapons through a national database, strengthen mental health checks and stiffen penalties for carrying guns near schools or giving them to minors. those proposals still under consideration are getting considerable pushback from lawmakers on both sides of the aisle. one fre
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. office superstore ink retailer in america. now get $6 back in staples rewards for every ink cartridge you recycle when you spend $50 on hp ink. staples. that was easy. >>> the great ezra klein wrote recently at the "washington post" that for all the good-natured joking about our nation's vice president, old handsome and all that, joe biden, ezra said, is secretly incredibly effective." that thesis about the vice president's effectiveness is about to get a major road test. today alone the vice president met with a bunch of political pressure groups who are not exactly thrilled with his current task, which is to come up with a policy to deter gun violence in our country. among the vice president's guests today were the nra. how that went and how it stands up to ezra's thesis is coming up. chronic osteoarthritis pain. imagine living your life with less chronic low back pain. imagine you with less pain. cymbalta can help. cymbalta is fda-approved to manage chronic musculoskeletal pain. one non-narcotic pill a day, ever
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> only two weeks to go now until the obama administration begins. the second obama administration two weeks to go until the ceremonial swearing in of president obama and vice president biden at the u.s. capitol. it will happen on monday, january 21st. now, that is also martin luther king day. interesting, though. the constitution says the president has to be sworn in specifically on the 20th day of january, not the 21st. but the 20th of january falls on a sunday this year. so they have decided to do this as kind of a two-step. on sunday, the 20th, chief justice john roberts will swear in president obama for his second term. but they'll do it at an official, small ceremony at the white house at noon on sunday. the following day, on monday, that will be the whole pomp and circumstance giant event. but that second swearing in ceremony, the big one on the day with everybody there, that is going to be ceremonial, because the real one will have happened the day before. it's kind of weird, right? that this is the second tim
say in the social sciences. we had a hypophysis. health care is the one area that all presidents know. they tend to be very sickly bunch. president by president you would be surprised how many health care problems they had to be the john f. kennedy got the last rites of the catholic church three times as an adult and his father was weeping by his hospital bed this was just a few years before he runs for president. so the hypophysis these are men who understand health and illness and by the way they are so sickly because the secrecy is more important than good health care but they don't get good health care at least that has been true in the past. and so of course during to be sensitive to health care issues. wrong, wrong. never was a hypothesis more refuted. they are tough guys. candy may be sickly but he wants to give the impression of health and it doesn't matter at all. what does matter interestingly the health of the people they loved. every president while in office conference the illness, take kennedy's case his father has a stroke. health care goes from i can t get or leave it
came to converse and talk about their ideology, their theology, their learning, their science of exploration, and it was really a convenience for learning. and it still is today. we trace our history back to 1753, when the providence library company formed, by the merchants and the man at the day to form and library greater than any one individual could. and they did that in order to share resources, and at that time the city was growing and they wanted to make that information available to all. so the providence library company existed in many places throughout the city, often being at the seat of town government, and they purchased their material from england. their original collection was about 345 titles. and fortunately had a tragic event in the late 1700s where there was a fire on christmas eve, and of those 345 titles, they had originally purchased, they lost many end up fire except for about 70 that were still in circulation. we actually have some of that founding collection. what's really interesting is that they had the foresight to make a notation so that they knew
to shine is the smoked pulled pork. i think it's done broseph! pretty much got it down to a science... pretty much. we also really like a great pulled pork sandwich even when we can't make the game. you ruined it! some people even like it better. really? yep. [ male announcer ] new carving board pulled pork, get that delicious slow smoked taste without the hassle. it's game time food. >>> good morning, everybody. i'm jon kelley. this morning san francisco police continue the search for a man wanted for dousing his girlfriend with gasoline and setting her on fire. they say 22-year-old dexter oliver attacked her yesterday afternoon near the intersection of hollister and jennings in the city's bay view district. 25-year-old star lamar now in critical condition in the burn unit at st. francis hospital. she has severe burns to her face and her chest. family members say oliver became enraged when lamar told him their relationship was over. >> saw him pour gasoline in a bottle and he left. i didn't know he was going to burn her. >> police say oliver is 5'10", 155 pounds and has a haircut w
judges, i think you have to ask those questions. those are simple questions. it is not rocket science. i used to teach in american university. used to teach courses to cops and prosecutors. this is not rocket science. i don't know if aid should be rocket science. i have been impressed that some people have said we really need a designed program knowing where we are working. if we know we're working in the most corrupt country and the world, we design a program that protects the funding. i was very impressed with that. [laughter] i have not seen a program with that bill 10. t in.ild people tell me they are thinking about it. some the -- someone told me the norwegians do that but i have not run into many norwegians. yes, sir? you are norwegian? >> no. one thing i came away with is that the afghans are very good at running their own businesses but what we do as we create an incentive or by running a business is about profits. i have partnered with an afghan and several afghans' over there and we are trying to build infrastructure where afghans have a stake in the infrastructure itself rathe
to wide-open spaces, which usually fail to attract pedestrians. an interesting unique buildings in science and of humanity abound. these conditions or were you thinking about a series of specific rows further organized into what i call the 10 steps awoke ability. these are explored later or together they add up to a complete prescription for making cities more walkable. we must understand the city is not just a nice idealistic notion, rather simple and practical minded solution to a host of complex problems we face as a society. problems of daily on in our nation's competitiveness, public welfare and environmental sustainability. for that reason the book is less a design treatise than an essential call to arms. why we need so badly is the subject of the next section. so what you essentially have is a two-part book. you have the three reasons why we need marketability, which are wealth, health and sustainability and then the 10 steps which are for example step one, put cars in their place, mixed uses comic at the parking right and my transit work, et cetera. i will not talk at all because t
not trust the medicine and science. >> to go to a point he made earlier, that is a process that .akes years, we are at the beginning of a long road. >> apropos something you said, i am not against experimentation. i am actually in favor of it. it is difficult to stabilize it. to take the game marriage example, i totally agree with you. so far the process has worked well. it is also the case we may not get enough time to run actual experiments because, half of the gay rights community -- it does not go fast enough, they are going to jump the gun on this. the problem is not totally similar in the marijuana situation. but i agree with you. you need some states that do not go down that road. you do not want the process to overwhelm the country where states that might be holdout's say, it is not worth the trouble, the enforcement cost is too high, what ever. that is my point. how hard it is to stabilize -- >> nobody is asking for a lot. what has happened on the marriage, which is interesting, although nine states have legalized it, a much larger number of states amended their constitution to for
at harvard wrote a piece, an op-ed in "christian science monitor" in december of 2008 or so. ncrc proposed doing this with federal fund through a federal agency. and i wrote an article in "the new republic" in lar of 2010 suggesting treasury could use tarp fund and act exactly as the homeowners loan corporation had done, do this not for a profit but specifically to help homeowners. american securitization forum wasn't for that either. >> i just, real quick point on just clarify my position. i'm not opposed to the in concept the use of eminent domain for borrowers who are upside-down, who are current. i'm simply saying that the priority would be in my view for those who are already experiencing financial distress. when you get to the point of they're current, i think other tests could be put in place. that's why i think there needs to be a lot more detail on the table before there's a vote of yes or no. for example, if you're paying 70% of the your income to keep that mortgage current, do you want to force that homeowner to actually go into default before they actually get help and wreck th
science projects within that 15 minutes. get a nice release. and mary lee came out of cradle strong, and pinging almost every single day since we released her. not always common with white sharks. they have different personalities like people and mary lee is a real finer. she is exciting and igniting enthusiasm on great whites we haven't seen before. >> how many great sharks are you watching? >> 40 sharks across africa and the eastern coast of the united states. >> thank you so much, chris fisher. incredibly cool. the story about how you washed people in jacksonville, even cooler, we'll tweet out the link to your website. this is fascinating. thank you very much. >> it is fascinating and an education. share it with your kids. tag sharks off the coast of cape cod and now off the coast of florida. >> 15 minutes to conduct hundreds of experiments. >> and his last name is fisher. perfect. what a great job. >> very cool. >>> a check of the top stories. nra, obama administration, 24 hours away fray showdown on gun control. the gun violence project gets down to business today meeting with
, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> at 30 minutes past the hour i'm carol costello. thanks for being with us again. lower manhattan in new york city for breaking news, pier 11 on the east river there's been a ferry accident. apparently the ferry ran into the dock there, this is in the wall street area, 12 to 15 people are injured. you see emergency crews on the scene, you see a lot of people on stretchers on the dock there with their heads secured because as you know, when something crashes, you can see the gash in the boat right there. so you can see how hard that thing hit so you can understand there might be cases of wh whip lash or other injuries. we have an interview from the wabc chopper pilot. let's listen. >> well i'm just going with what i'm watching here at the scene, you can take that injury count up to around 20, that's how many patients we count again on the ground, you can see on the stretchers and in wheelchairs, one other note in the rear of the boat we just saw them
something out of an old fashioned science fix movie. adam housley has had a look at it live in l.a. what do you think. >> reporter: it's a throwback to the days of those huge air ships. what is different this time is it's healy um and they've created something here that is entirely new all together. inside a southern california hangar built during world war ii floats a craft that could revolutionize airtrans port. >> it's very simple, it takes off, lands, and it goes physically anywhere with no infrastructure. >> reporter: it's not a blimp or a balloon but a next generation aircraft made of aluminum and carbon tpaoeurb. it can hold more than 60 tons of tkarg go has a range of 32 # hundred miles and doesn't need a landing strip. >> this vehicle could go there not have to touchdown off-load the cargo and go on. with the internal compartment of this vehicle there is no itemizing the load. we can rearrange the load internal for the vehicle while it's moving. >> reporter: this is called a proof of design, roughly half the size of what the eventual rigid structure will be. dry weight 36,000 pound
famously and ultimately was forced out because his comments about women can't do math and science. he was treasury secretary and then timothy geithner and the tradition is continuing. that's what equal opportunity is about. you have to go beyond the people you know and it has to be all over the country. that's what job searches are about. reaching out to people. not just your comfort zone and that will make a better country and it's not just for reasons. it's very practical when you look at the economy, for example. it would have been extremely practical to get someone who's not actually involved in the economic crisis. >> but you have to realize, with charlie rangel's critique the caveat is there's this long-standing kind of, not bitterness but separation between the cdc and the caucus members and barack obama. he kind of stepped outside of the black pipeline. he didn't play ball with them. >> and the sort of other version, i wouldn't call it the "harvard problem" but the basic social networks. the entire rise of barack obama was in some ways building a parallel set of networks to th
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